A Joint Service of Bradley University and Illinois State University
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

Former congressman Davis gets new job with a D.C. lobbying firm

Susan Brooks, Rodney Davis, Jodey Arrington
Jacquelyn Martin/AP
/
AP
Rep. Jodey Arrington, R-Texas, far left, Rep. Susan Brooks, R-Ind., and Rep. Rodney Davis, R-Ill., approach the microphones to speak to the media on Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2019, after meeting with a group of House Republicans and President Donald Trump at the White House.

One week after leaving office, former central Illinois congressman Rodney Davis has a new job.

The former five-term lawmaker from Taylorville has joined the Washington, D.C. lobbying firm of Cozen O’Connor Public Strategies as a managing director.

“It has been the honor of a lifetime to work alongside my colleagues on a bipartisan basis to improve the quality of life for all Americans,” Davis said in a news release. “With Cozen O’Connor Public Strategies, I’m eager for the opportunity to carry on my public policy work.”

Davis lost in the Republican primary last year to fellow incumbent Mary Miller.

The head of the U.S. House Financial Services Committee, Patrick McHenry, R-N.C., told Politico that Davis was one of the most sought-after lawmakers leaving Congress.

A good government advocate said the revolving door from Capitol Hill to K Street is far too common because of the potential for corruption between current and former lawmakers and wealthy special interests.

“Former Congressman Davis’ actions are unremarkable, but that doesn’t make them any less problematic,” said Donald Sherman, senior vice president and chief legal counsel for the Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington. “The revolving door is a continual reminder there needs to be more aggressive ethics reform on the Hill.”

Sherman said Congress is unlikely to consider tougher ethics reforms to eliminate conflicts of interest because the current system suits lawmakers well.

We depend on your support to keep telling stories like this one. You – together with NPR donors across the country – create a more informed public. Fact by fact, story by story. Please take a moment to donate now and fund the local news our community needs. Your support truly makes a difference.

Eric Stock is the News Director at WGLT. You can contact Eric at ejstoc1@ilstu.edu.