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How can we prepare for a hotter world?

WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 21: A young visitor to the U.S. Capitol Building takes a drink in the shade as much of the Northeast braces for a heat wave on June 21, 2024 in Washington, DC. Temperatures are forecasted to soar into the high 90s, with a heat index surpassing 100 degrees. (Photo by Andrew Harnik/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 21: A young visitor to the U.S. Capitol Building takes a drink in the shade as much of the Northeast braces for a heat wave on June 21, 2024 in Washington, DC. Temperatures are forecasted to soar into the high 90s, with a heat index surpassing 100 degrees. (Photo by Andrew Harnik/Getty Images)

Deadlyheat waves are scorching cities across continents in the Northern Hemisphere; a sign that climate change may once again fuel record-breaking heat. This year’s summer could surpass last year’s as the warmest in 2,000 years.

In only the first few days of summer India had the longest heatwave on record,China experienced some of the worst flooding in history, and closerto home heat domes burned from coast to coast, with damagingrains in the Midwest andwildfires in New Mexico

report last month by leading climate scientists examined 76 extreme heat waves across 90 countries over a 12-month period starting in May 2023. In that period, 6.3 billion people – roughly 78% of the population – experienced at least 31 days of extreme heat.

We discuss the recent global heatwaves and examine who’s most vulnerable.

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