© 2024 Peoria Public Radio
A joint service of Bradley University and Illinois State University
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
0:00 0:00
Available On Air Stations

The psychology of jury selection

NEW YORK, NEW YORK - APRIL 18: Former U.S. President Donald Trump exits the courtroom following his criminal trial at Manhattan Criminal Court in New York City.
NEW YORK, NEW YORK - APRIL 18: Former U.S. President Donald Trump exits the courtroom following his criminal trial at Manhattan Criminal Court in New York City.

It’s a right guaranteed not once, but twice in our constitution – a trial by jury. And many of us are asked to serve on them, whether we want to or not.

For some, getting a jury summons in the mail brings to mind scenes from courtroom dramas in popular culture – like the 1957 film “12 Angry Men.” 

For others, the prospect of jury dutyisa chore to get out of, like when Tina Fey’s character in the show “30 Rock” showed up dressed like Princess Leia. 

Whether jury duty is a responsibility you dread or relish, the trial of former President Trump in Manhattan put the spotlight on the jury selection process – one that happens every day in courthouses across the country.

We speak with legal experts about the role juries play in our justice system – and the psychology of jury selection. But first, we hear from someone who’s served on a jury for another high-profile case.

Copyright 2024 WAMU 88.5

Anna Casey